Posts associated with "Multi-Gene Panels"

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ICARE Newsletter Summer 2019

Expanding Our Thinking About Cancer Risks in TP53 Mutations and Li-Fraumeni Syndrome

Since expanded genetic testing has become available through multigene panel tests, studies have suggested that many people identified to have TP53 mutations do not have a typical personal or family history, which is usually seen with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). A recent study looking at over 300 individuals with TP53 mutations (identified through multi-gene panel testing) …

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Permanent link to this article: https://inheritedcancer.net/11nls2019/

ICARE Newsletter Winter 2018

Advances in Cancer Screening Among Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Patients

Several research groups from around the world that have conducted cancer screening among patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome and a germline TP53 mutation have recently reported on their observations. Specifically, the National Cancer Institute group demonstrated that screening inclusive of rapid total body MRI detected cancers at an early stage,1 similar to findings published through other …

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Permanent link to this article: https://inheritedcancer.net/5nlw2018/

ICARE Newsletter Summer 2017

Breast and Ovarian Cancer Associations for Genes Tested Through Multi-Gene Panels

As testing for multiple genes at the same time (“multi-gene panel testing”) has become increasingly available with tremendous advances in genetic testing technology, it has become critical to evaluate and refine cancer associations and levels of risk for many of these genes now tested. Through a commercial laboratory database of almost 100,000 results of multi-gene …

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Permanent link to this article: https://inheritedcancer.net/2nls2017/

ICARE Newsletter Summer 2012

Emerging Cancer Panels for Testing Patients for Inherited Cancer Predisposition

Genetic testing for inherited cancer predisposition is typically performed by testing for one condition at a time. However, with the tremendous advances in genetic testing technologies over the last few years, the cost of testing has plummeted. To put this into perspective, the first human genome cost 2-3 billion dollars to sequence and took over …

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Permanent link to this article: https://inheritedcancer.net/1nls2012/